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The Science of Laziness

Why are some people so lazy? Is there a couch-potato gene?
Check out ‘The Sports Gene’: http://amzn.to/1hcbtTr
Science Of Productivity: http://bit.ly/1m97POC
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Special thanks to David Epstein for help with this episode: http://thesportsgene.com/

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Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz).

Further Reading–

Neurobiology of Mice Selected for High Voluntary Wheel-running Activity
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21676789

Mice from lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running exhibit lower blood pressure during withdrawal from wheel access
http://biology.ucr.edu/people/faculty/Garland/Kolb_et_al_2013_exercise_addiction_in_High-Runner_mice.pdf

Patterns of Brain Activity With Variation in Voluntary Wheel-Running Behaviour
http://www.biology.ucr.edu/people/faculty/Garland/RhodesEA03Fos.pdf

Current understanding of the genetic basis for physical activity.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21270357

Genetic influences on exercise participation in 37,051 twin pairs from seven countries.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17183649

Does the difference between physically active and couch potato lie in the dopamine system?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20224735